France Photos 2018

Here are a number of pictures from our trip, taken from our social media postings and emails, plus a couple of additional pictures and a video of the fireworks celebrating la Fête nationale.

ADDED: Here’s a map with photos embedded.

 

We spent the first two days here recovering from lack of sleep, reacquainting ourselves with the area, and walking up and down the Seine.

Yesterday, we visited Versailles for the first time. The palace is beautiful, definitely worth the long line to get in.
The gardens are like little mini-forests with surprises in the middle of each. This was my favorite.

Today we went to L’Orangerie. I found Monet’s willow paintings fascinating and calming. If you haven’t been there, I encourage you to visit virtually.

After watching France win the world cup quarter finals in Versailles, we were excited to watch the ​semi finals in Paris. And we weren’t disappointed. ​People walked around draped in the French flag. Every bar and restaurant had people spilling out onto the street, stretching to see the tv screens inside. They sang the national anthem when it played at the beginning of the game and then again, spontaneously, as it became clear that France would win. Here is the restaurant we were sitting at. You can see Kev in the middle (under “CAFE”) with a man in white standing over him so he could see the screen.

Earlier ​in​ the day we ​went to ​the ​A​rc d​e​​ Triomphe, Then a walk down the Champs-Elysees, through the gardens, to the U.S. Embassy (which we couldn’t get any good photos of because of the high security).

The​ next day we took a​ 4-hour train ride went past fields of sunflowers and small herds of white cows​, to ​Arles​. It​ is a small town with ​lots of ​Roman ruins where Vincent Van Gogh lived. It ​is full of​ tourists and art during the summer festivals.

We spent the first couple of days here getting to know the city with our handy Rick Steves guide.
There is so much to see here, including locations used in famous Van Gogh paintings, well preserved Roman relics and architecture…
…and not-so-well-preserved Roman architecture. When I commented on the almost unrestricted access to these sites, Kev’s response was “That’s why they’re called ‘ruins’, because you can’t ruin them anymore.”

This is NOT our video, but it was obviously taken by someone very close to our vantage point on the riverbank!

 

Sunset over the Rhône. cf Van Gogh, Vincent.